ABOUT ME

I have been working on various aspects of Ranavirus biology since 2004. My focus has always been on amphibian ranaviruses, but I am interested in a broad range of affected taxa.

While my career has brought me to a place where my primary duty is the instruction of undergraduates, I do try to maintain my Ranavirus research through various collaborations.

I regularly mentor undergraduate research students on my own or in conjunction with other colleagues.

EDUCATION

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Ranavirus Community Dynamics

A long standing interest for me is how Ranavirus infections move and persist in amphibian communities.

2006 - 2010

Queen Mary, University of London, UK

Ph.D. in Biological Sciences

Ranavirus Phylogenetics

This is an active area of student oriented research. We are currently examining which of the 26 core Iridovirus genes are best suited for phylogenetic reconstruction in ranaviruses.

Mathematical Ecology of Ranaviruses

Another long standing research interest for me is the examination of Ranavirus ecology and epidemiology using mathematical models. This research is done in conjunction with several colleagues from various institutions.

General Amphibian Biology

I am very interested in most aspects of amphibian biology, especially natural history. 

2004 - 2006

Trent University, Peterborough, ON, Canada

MSc. in Watershed Ecosystems

2000-2004

Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada

BSc.H. in Biology with Distinction

OTHER QUALIFICATIONS

2006 - 2010

Queen Mary, University of London, UK

Ph.D. in Biological Sciences

2015

B2 Scholars Program

2013

American Society for Microbiology – Burroughs Wellcome Fund Science Teaching Fellow

Aquatic Turtle Community Health

I am interested in the health of aquatic turtles, specifically looking for emerging infections and their effects at the community level. This work is done with several faculty collaborators. 

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